Uveitis in cats: How to treat it and reasons

Uveitis in cats

Uveitis is a condition that affects cats. Front uveitis is inflammation of the uvea, the black tissue of the eye that includes blood vessels, at the front or anterior region of the eye. Typically, the iris — the tissue that makes up the pupil – is affected. It’s possible that the back of the eye will be damaged.

Anterior uveitis can be caused by a number of things:

how did my cat get uveitis ?

  • Conditions caused by the immune system, in which the body assaults its own tissues.
  • Viruses, parasites, fungus, bacteria, and protozoa infections
  • Cancers or tumors
  • An eye injury or trauma
  • Metabolic disorder affecting the eye from elsewhere in the body
  • The term idiopathic refers to a condition where the etiology is uncertain.
  • Lens-induced cataracts are formed by lens protein escaping into the ocular fluid and are most commonly linked with cataracts.

Cats’ eyes are infected with more viruses than those of other animals. Feline leukemia virus, feline immunodeficiency virus, and feline infectious peritonitis virus are examples of such viruses. Toxoplasmosis, a protozoal parasite, is one of the most prevalent causes of anterior uveitis in cats.

Inside/outdoor pets are more likely to be exposed to infectious causes than exclusively indoor pets, and older cats are more likely to have tumors’. In addition, various infectious illnesses are more widespread in certain parts of the world.

Your pet’s vision may be threatened by anterior uveitis, which can be uncomfortable. This issue might potentially be an indication of an illness that is affecting the rest of your pet’s body.

Things to Keep an Eye On

  • Redness 
  • Tearing
  • Especially in bright light, squinting
  • A pupil that is tiny or irregularly shaped.
  • The front of the eye has a hazy or dull look.
  • An iris that isn’t uniformly clouded — a regular yellow-green iris might turn bright red, develop brown blotches, or have dots.

Anterior Uveitis in Cats Diagnosis

To diagnose anterior uveitis and rule out other disorders, diagnostic tests are required. The following tests may be performed:

  • A thorough medical history and physical examination are required.
  • An ophthalmoscope is used to examine the entire eye, including the exterior area, the front segment of the interior of the eye, and the rear half.
  • Tonometry is a technique for determining the pressure within the eye.
  • A complete blood count (CBC) and a serum biochemical profile are two common blood tests.
  • Immune illnesses, infectious pathogens, and other systemic diseases require specific blood testing.
  • Ultrasound, X-rays, or aspirates (liquid samples collected from inside the eye using a tiny needle) are all options.

Treatment for Cats with Anterior Uveitis

can uveitis in cats be cured ?
Symptomatic treatment is frequently recommended, regardless of the etiology of anterior uveitis. Topical therapies, such as eye drops or ointments, and oral drugs are intended to relieve pain and inflammation – for example, treating a headache with aspirin regardless of the cause.

If the cause of the anterior uveitis has been identified, specific treatment is prescribed. Appropriate topical and/or oral medications are provided, which may include an antifungal or an anti-inflammatory medicine.

Surgical intervention is required. Surgery to remove the eye may be necessary if there is a tumor or subsequent problems (such as glaucoma) that cannot be treated with treatments.

Prevention and Care at Home

It’s crucial that you follow your veterinarian’s advice and learn how to properly administer your pet. It’s not always simple to get drugs into an animal’s eye, but it’s critical that they are delivered.

Every day, check your pet’s eyes for any slight changes. Follow-up visits to re-examine the eye should be made with your veterinarian.

You have some influence over your pet’s surroundings. Keeping cats indoors protects them from many of the infectious illnesses that cause anterior uveitis.

Avoid eye trauma by throwing balls or other objects with caution.

Uveitis in cats
cat pet

Anterior Uveitis in Cats: A Comprehensive Guide

The term “anterior uveitis” simply means “inflammation inside the eye.” Because uveitis can be caused by a variety of disorders, determining the underlying cause can be challenging. Some of the disorders listed below are only found in the eyes. In certain situations, however, the illness may affect numerous regions of the body, with the eye being only one of them. A pet may have ocular signs (those relating to the eye) or multisystem indicators (weakness, lethargy, decreased appetite, coughing, fever, or other symptoms).

There are various infectious causes of anterior uveitis. Among the most common causes are:

1- Viruses are infectious illnesses. Flevo (feline leukemia virus), FIV (feline immunodeficiency virus), FIP (feline immunodeficiency virus) (feline infectious peritonitis virus).

2- Protozoal infection. Toxoplasmosis is a protozoan parasite that affects cats more than dogs. It’s a potentially zoonotic disease, which means that people can get it from cats who are shedding the parasite in their faces. If your cat has been diagnosed with toxoplasmosis, it’s critical to discuss the risks with your veterinarian and physician. This is especially crucial for pregnant women, children under the age of five, the elderly, and those with impaired immune systems.


3- Fungi infections such as blastomycosis, histoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, coccidioidomycosis, and candidiasis. Different fungi are more frequent in dogs than in cats, as well as in different parts of the world. In cats, cryptococcosis and histoplasmosis are more common. The posterior (rear) portion of the eye, as well as the front, are frequently affected by fungus.

4- There are many distinct bacteria strains and toxin kinds. Inflammation inside the eye can be caused by a distant illness such as a uterine or kidney infection. Many tick-borne infections induce uveitis in dogs, but only very infrequently in cats.

The following are some of the other causes of anterior uveitis:

  • Viruses are infectious illnesses. Flevo (feline leukemia virus), FIV (feline immunodeficiency virus), FIP (feline immunodeficiency virus) (feline infectious peritonitis virus).

  • Protozoal infection. Toxoplasmosis is a protozoan parasite that affects cats more than dogs. It’s a potentially zoonotic disease, which means that people can get it from cats who are shedding the parasite in their fasces. If your cat has been diagnosed with toxoplasmosis, it’s critical to discuss the risks with your veterinarian and physician. This is especially crucial for pregnant women, children under the age of five, the elderly, and those with impaired immune systems.

  • Blastomycosis, histoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, coccidioidomycosis, and candidiasis are examples of fungal infections. Different fungi are more frequent in dogs than in cats, as well as in different parts of the world. In cats, cryptococcosis and histoplasmosis are more common. The posterior (rear) portion of the eye, as well as the front, are frequently affected by fungus.

Trauma. Because the uvea includes multiple blood vessels, any form of head or eye injury can result in uveitis. As a result, additional inflammation and “bruising” might ensue.

Diseases of the metabolism. Because the uvea is an extension of the circulatory system of the body, many disorders that affect the body can affect the eye. Hypertension, increased circulating proteins, and uremia are only a few examples.When cataracts are present, lens-induced anterior uveitis can occur. A cataract is a cloudiness in the lens. Lens-induced uveitis is more prevalent in dogs, although it can also happen in cats if the lens is disrupted by a penetrating injury to the eye.

Trauma. Because the uvea has multiple blood vessels, any form of head or eye damage can result in uveitis. This can induce subsequent inflammation and “bruising.”

Diseases of metabolism The uvea is an extension of the body’s circulating blood system, therefore many disorders that affect the body can affect the eye. Hypertension, high circulating proteins, and uremia are only a few examples.

When there are cataracts, lens-induced anterior uveitis can occur. An opacity of the lens is known as a cataract. Although lens-induced uveitis is more prevalent in dogs, it can also happen in cats if the lens is disrupted by a penetrating injury to the eye.


Diseases caused by the immune system. The immune system of the animal “attacks” itself in these disorders. Thrombocytopenia, in which platelets are attacked and killed by the immune system, and hemolytic anemia, in which red blood cells are attacked and destroyed by the immune system, are two of the most common disorders in dogs. Any uveitis that occurs as a result of these circumstances is a side effect.

, blindness, and lens luxation are among secondary disorders that can complicate anterior uveitis.

Uveitis in Cats Signs

  • Putting a paw on one or both eyes
  • Shutting one or both eyes
  • Squinting one or both eyes because they don’t like to be petted on the head
  • Blinking of one or both eyes on a regular basis
  • Bright light should be avoided.
  • Eye irritability
  • discharge from the eyes
  • The eyes are cloudy
  • stumbling across items

Uveitis causes cats to paw at the injured eye, indicating that they are in a lot of discomfort. They frequently close the sore eye or eyes and squint or blink frequently. Bright light aversion is frequent, and your cat may react with aggressiveness or hesitation if you try to pat it on the head.

If you look into your cat’s eye, you may notice inflammation in or around the eye, which appears clouded or even bleeding. In a cat with uveitis, a clear, white, or purulent discharge may also be visible in the corner of the eye. Blindness can develop if left untreated, and your cat may begin to bump into things in your home.

How Can Uveitis Be Prevented?

While certain causes of uveitis are difficult, if not impossible, to avoid, there are some steps you may take to reduce your cat’s risk of developing it. Infections should be treated quickly, diabetes and excessive blood pressure should be managed carefully, and your cat’s eyes should not be damaged or exposed to dangerous poisons. Finally, frequent veterinarian checks can aid in the detection of minor concerns before they become major ones.

how long does it take for uveitis to heal in cats ?

Most cases of uveitis improve within twenty-four hours if appropriately treated. It may take a few days for the eye to clear if it is really hazy or if there has been a hemorrhage. After highly severe or repeated instances of uveitis, complications are more likely.

is uveitis common in cats ?

In cats, uveitis is a frequent and painful eye illness that can lead to blindness. Uveitis is frequently caused by an acquired ocular or systemic illness; nevertheless, despite rigorous diagnostic testing, the underlying etiology is frequently unknown.

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